Tagged: water

Farmers, Ashanti, Ghana

World Water Day

It’s World Water Day. This year’s World Water Day focuses attention on food security – because for all the water we drink, more water goes in to producing our food. While we may drink between 2 and 4 litres of water per day, to produce a kilo of wheat needs 1,500 litres...

Repairing a borehole in Bosomkyekye, Ghana

Water, poo and people power

Last week, Ban Ki-moon announced that the UN millennium development goal to ‘halve the number of people who do not have access to safe drinking water’ by 2015 had been met – five years early. But it has quickly become clear that, while this is good news, it’s not all good news. The actual...

Borehole pipe section

What a borehole.

This is a borehole repair at Bosomkyekye, a reasonable size village outside Mampong. A borehole is not an insult. It’s a deep hole drilled in the ground that water comes out of through a pump. Sometimes it’s 120-odd feet deep. That’s not 120 odd feet. They’re quite normal feet. It means approximate,...

Superfastwaterpumping

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=faGtMM76RvA Amusing as this might be, it’s pretty much a lesson in how not to use a water pump. They break when treated like this.

Water and stuff

I’m writing this hoping that the internet connection on my phone will hold out long enough for me to upload it. It’s a peaceful night in Gyetiase (pronounced jyeh-tee-yah-seh); the goats have gone to bed but the crickets have woken up. Someone’s nattering in Twi on the front porch of the eye...

Flooded fields near Kep

Lessons from a rainy kingdom

Each year in South East Asia, the months from June through October see monsoon rains, consisting of torrential daily rainfall. This is a predicable annual event in Cambodia, where 75% of the country lies no more than 100m above sea level, and sophisticated irrigation systems and reservoirs were built a thousand years ago. As increasing population, tourism and industrialisation hamper Cambodia’s ability to manage flooding, what can we in the UK still learn from Cambodia about flood management?